Troutbitten

Angler Pressure TWO -- What It Does to the Fishing

April 16, 2023 Domenick Swentosky Season 7 Episode 2
Angler Pressure TWO -- What It Does to the Fishing
Troutbitten
More Info
Troutbitten
Angler Pressure TWO -- What It Does to the Fishing
Apr 16, 2023 Season 7 Episode 2
Domenick Swentosky

This is the second episode of our two part discussion on angler pressure. Last time, we talked about how fishing pressure affects the fish — how they respond to more fishermen placing more casts and drifts in the waters around them — how trout change, both short term and long term.

And now, we’re building on those thoughts and offering some solutions. Because if trout are adapting their habits in response to us, then we must modify our own approach to stay one step ahead of the fish.

I used that phrase in the last podcast a couple of times too. And it’s a good way to think about it. Our fishing is based on fooling a trout. What are they looking to eat? How can we attract them to a fly and then convince them to eat it, right? And while you might have the methods and flies necessary to fool your local trout right now, it might not work just a few years from now. Because trout and the rivers they live in are always changing. So our approach must keep changing too. It’s just another aspect of trout fishing that makes it all so wonderfully complicated.

It’s also why we like to fish for wild trout . . .

We Cover the Following

  • Water selection
  • Finding fresh fish
  • Wild vs Stocked response to angler pressure
  • How long until a trout resets from angler pressure
  • Genetically passing on the effects of angler pressure
  • Presentations, convinced or curious?
  • Patterns, natural or attractive?
  • . . . and more

Resources

READ: Troutbitten | Front Ended -- Can We Stop Doing This to Each Other?
READ: Troutbitten | Natural vs Attractive Presentations
READ: Troutbitten | Why Everyone Fishes the Same Water and What to Do About It
PODCAST: Troutbitten | Rude On the River -- Front Ended and the Golden Rule

Visit

Troutbitten Website

Troutbitten Instagram

Troutbitten YouTube

Troutbitten Facebook


Thank You to Pre-Roll Ad Sponsors:

Skwala

and

Orvis

Show Notes

This is the second episode of our two part discussion on angler pressure. Last time, we talked about how fishing pressure affects the fish — how they respond to more fishermen placing more casts and drifts in the waters around them — how trout change, both short term and long term.

And now, we’re building on those thoughts and offering some solutions. Because if trout are adapting their habits in response to us, then we must modify our own approach to stay one step ahead of the fish.

I used that phrase in the last podcast a couple of times too. And it’s a good way to think about it. Our fishing is based on fooling a trout. What are they looking to eat? How can we attract them to a fly and then convince them to eat it, right? And while you might have the methods and flies necessary to fool your local trout right now, it might not work just a few years from now. Because trout and the rivers they live in are always changing. So our approach must keep changing too. It’s just another aspect of trout fishing that makes it all so wonderfully complicated.

It’s also why we like to fish for wild trout . . .

We Cover the Following

  • Water selection
  • Finding fresh fish
  • Wild vs Stocked response to angler pressure
  • How long until a trout resets from angler pressure
  • Genetically passing on the effects of angler pressure
  • Presentations, convinced or curious?
  • Patterns, natural or attractive?
  • . . . and more

Resources

READ: Troutbitten | Front Ended -- Can We Stop Doing This to Each Other?
READ: Troutbitten | Natural vs Attractive Presentations
READ: Troutbitten | Why Everyone Fishes the Same Water and What to Do About It
PODCAST: Troutbitten | Rude On the River -- Front Ended and the Golden Rule

Visit

Troutbitten Website

Troutbitten Instagram

Troutbitten YouTube

Troutbitten Facebook


Thank You to Pre-Roll Ad Sponsors:

Skwala

and

Orvis